Magic Fit® replaces the measuring tape.

Faster and more accurate than a human tailor, Magic Fit® uses technology to make custom easy.


switch to inches
Gender

Your height determines how long we make your Tee (obviously), but also sleeve length.

Height
CM

When combined with height and age your weight helps us predict body shape which can be qualified in the next step.

Weight
KG

Your age qualifies weight because older bodies are different. Age is also statistically significant when calculating your waist, hip and bicep.

D.O.B
Date

Your bra allows us to account for bust and is also statistically significant for predicting your hips.

BRA
AU


Your Magic Fit® Tee.

CHEST 
WAIST 
HIP 
LENGTH 

When you’re ready to buy, tell us what makes your body unique and we’ll customise these measures even further...


Welcome to the Pack!

Use 'BLUESWIMMER' at checkout for $10 off your first Magic Fit® Tee.

Know what you want?


Tell us straight and we'll make it happen.





Short Crew


Checkout

100% Certified Organic Cotton 'Light' 110 GSM

Our lightweight organic cotton is grown and spun in India before being knitted in Melbourne at 110 gsm. Perfect for the Aussie summer it's ultra soft and naturally breathable with a luxurious drape as well as being Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certified.

Please note we only offer dark colours in this fabric which are guaranteed opaque, because on lighter colours (inc. white) it can become semi-sheer.


Swatch pack includes all fabrics and free shipping


100% Certified Organic Cotton 'Everyday' 145 GSM

Our 'everyday' organic cotton is grown and spun in India before being knitted in Melbourne at 145 gsm for the ultimate year-round weight.

It's incredibly soft, naturally breathable and washes like a dream as well as being Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certified.


Swatch pack includes all fabrics and free shipping


100% Certified Organic Cotton 'Heavy' 180 GSM

Our heavier organic cotton is grown and spun in India before being knitted in Melbourne at 180 gsm, perfect for winter layering.

With an amazingly soft handle and just as breathable as the 145 gsm, the extra weight provides more stability and durability as well as being Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certified.


Swatch pack includes all fabrics and free shipping


55% Hemp / 45% Organic Cotton

Hemp is the planet-friendly miracle fibre produced from the stem of the cannabis plant. Biodegradable and naturally organic requiring zero pesticides or herbicides, hemp also uses 50 percent less water than cotton.

With a visible texture similar to pure linen our 210 gsm weight is blended with organic cotton for softness to achieve the perfect balance between opacity, breathability and UV resistance making it ideal for the long hot Aussie summers.


Swatch pack includes all fabrics and free shipping


100% Superfine Non-Mulesed Merino Wool

Our 17.5 micron 'superfine' pure merino wool is single-origin sourced from happy sheep 300km west of Sydney before being knitted in Melbourne. How do we know they're happy? Because we exclusively buy certified cruelty-free 'non-mulesed' wool.

The extra-long staple ewe's fleece makes a 150 gsm cloth that is softer, smoother and more resistant to pilling than regular merino and feels like true luxury against the skin.


Swatch pack includes all fabrics and free shipping


Saffron is a spice of contradictions.

For starters, it comes from a purple flower, with red stigmas, that yields a deep yellow- orange colour. It is much sought after by humans, and yet we have selectively bred it to such an extent that it cannot reproduce or survive without our help.

It was originally intended as a flavour enhancer but ended up as a clothes dye, medicine, perfume, magic potion and aphrodisiac to name just a few. So what is it about this particular spice that has led us to steal, murder and even start wars just to acquire it?

Well, to answer that, we first need to do a little digging.

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Citizen Wolf | Saffron is the dried stigma (aka the part of the flower that germinates pollen) of a particular autumn flowering crocus called Crocus sativus.

Saffron is the dried stigma of a particular autumn flowering crocus called Crocus sativus, first cultivated in the Bronze Age in Greece.

Saffron is the dried stigma (aka the part of the flower that germinates pollen) of a particular autumn flowering crocus called Crocus sativus.

It was first cultivated in the Bronze Age in Greece, and over the millennia has been selectively bred to maximise the length of the three stigma in each flower. Ironically, this process has rendered the plant entirely sterile, and now Saffron can only be propagated by human hands.

Despite this, its cultivation continued apace spreading eastwards to Persia and China, and westwards through Europe and finally to America. Today, Iran is responsible for 85 percent of global production and Persian saffron is widely regarded by the cognoscenti as being the best in the world.

Initially, its subtle earthy / grassy flavor and sweet floral aroma saw it used primarily for cooking and it quickly became integral to many famous regional dishes. Think Provençal bouillabaisse, risotto Milanese, Cornish saffron buns, Persian pilafs, Valencian paella, and, perhaps most famously, Indian biryanis.

Indeed, the use of Saffron has been documented right back to the Middle Ages as a food colouring, as this 14th Century recipe for swan illustrates all too graphically – “Once the bird is on the fire, you must “glaze it with saffron; and when it is cooked, it should be redressed in its skin, with the neck either straight or flat. Endorse the feathers and head with a paste made of egg yolks mixed with saffron and honey.” - Le Viandier de Taillevent.

 

COLOURFUL HISTORY

Citizen Wolf | Due to its value and bright colour, saffron became a symbol of status as well as spirituality

Saffron is an overwhelmingly positive colour that signifies happiness and success, and wearing it is said to enhance both your personality and confidence.

Citizen Wolf | Saffron is also a symbol of spirituality

As well as being highly-prized for its distinct taste, it was also much acclaimed for the striking golden hue it bestowed on the dish. Unsurprisingly, it wasn’t long before enquiring minds began to wonder if that same golden colour might be imparted to fabrics and garments.

Saffron is an overwhelmingly positive colour that signifies happiness and success, and wearing Saffron is said to enhance both your personality and confidence. Persian Emperors in the 10th Century B.C. were the first to wear saffron for their robes of state and it has also been found interwoven into ancient Persian royal carpets and funeral shrouds.

500 years later it was adopted by the Buddhist monks of Asia to dye their robes, and in the process, saffron acquired a symbolic meaning of simplicity and detachment from materialism.

In India, Saffron gained great significance to Hindus, known as both the colour of fire and also symbolic of knowledge burning up ignorance. When India gained its independence in 1947, Saffron was chosen as one of the three colours of the Indian national flag, representing the strength and courage of the country.

 

 

 

 

 

POSH SPICE

Citizen Wolf | because of its high value, saffron quickly become a favourite of many ancient rulers.

Each flower blooms for only one week a year, and produces only three strands of stigma. Harvesting can only occur mid-morning, when the flowers are still closed in order to protect the delicate stigmas.

Whilst interesting, none of this explains why Saffron became so damn expensive. And when we say expensive, we mean astronomical! Saffron is easily the most expensive spice on Earth, costing as much as $16 for a single gram (aka $16,000 / kilogram!), approximately 20x more expensive than Vanilla beans, the world’s second most bougie spice.

And the reason is simple – Saffron is incredibly labour-intensive.

For starters, each flower only blooms for one week a year, and produces only three strands of stigma per flower. These strands are extremely fragile, which necessitates the flowers being harvested by hand, which can only be done mid-morning, when the flowers are still closed in order to protect the delicate stigmas.

It takes 210,000 stigmas to make half a kilo of saffron, and over 200 hours of back-breaking labour to pick them, so you can start to appreciate why it has acquired such a hefty price tag.

 

With Saffron being as valuable as it is, it won’t come as any surprise to learn that for thousands of years humans have viewed it as a kind of wonder drug. It pops up in history in many guises including, deodorants, paints, lipsticks, magic potions, divine offerings and as a universal cure all.

Supposedly, Cleopatra and Alexander the Great both liked to bathe in saffron-infused baths, though for vastly different reasons. Cleo liked to wallow in saffron-infused mare’s milk, believing that it would enhance her sexuality to prospective suitors, whilst Alex used it more prosaically, to cure his war wounds.

Both the Romans, and Cardinal Wolsey (royal advisor to Henry VIII) used saffron as a sort of rudimentary air freshener, scattering it on floors to get rid of the pungent smells that undoubtedly proliferated in both eras.

But it is undoubtedly in the field of medicine that Saffron has enjoyed the greatest use, if not the greatest success. Variously, it has been used by traditional healers for everything from heartache to haemorrhoids, appetite suppressant to aphrodisiac.

Modern studies have shown the high levels of antioxidants found in saffron may help ward off inflammation in the body and that it may be helpful in treating sexual dysfunction and depression. However, the jury is still out as to whether some of the health benefits attributed to Saffron, including as a cure for both cardiovascular disease and cancer, actually have any substance to them.

 

SCARY SPICE

Citizen Wolf | Saffrons perceived value gave it an aura of medicinal and curative properties

In medieval times, Saffron was even prescribed (erroneously) as an antidote for the bubonic plague. This caused demand to skyrocket in Europe, and saffron was imported by shipload from Mediterranean islands such as Rhodes.

Citizen Wolf | Saffron sky rocketed in demand during the Bubonic Plague 

In medieval times, Saffron was even prescribed (erroneously) as an antidote for the bubonic plague. This caused demand to skyrocket in Europe, and saffron was imported by shipload from Mediterranean islands such as Rhodes.

One such cargo, worth $500,000 in today’s money, was stolen by a group of nobleman, and the ensuing bout of saffron piracy lead to the 14 week ‘Saffron War’.

Later, the rampant adulteration of saffron lead to the Safranschou code, under which adulterers (of saffron, not the other kind) could be fined, imprisoned or even put to death. Like the unfortunate Elss Pfnognerin, who was buried alive,  covered in her own saffron. True story.

Being so expensive, saffron is never far away from the news. In fact, as recently as this week, unscrupulous Spanish “dealers” have been busted by Europol for importing Iranian Saffron, bulking it out and selling it as the highly-prized Spanish variant.

 

ADD SOME FLAVOUR TO YOUR WARDROBE WITH DEEP SAFFRON

LIMITED EDITION 150 PIECES FOR MEN + WOMEN.

Whether you eat it, use it to dye your clothes, use it as a medicine or even as an aphrodisiac, there’s no denying the hold Saffron exerts over our lives. And it would seem, that even though it is prohibitively expensive, we simply can’t afford to live without it. 

 

 

 

Citizen Wolf | Womens Long Sleeve Tees in Deep Saffron

 

Citizen Wolf | T-shirts made to measure with Magic Fit®️ in Deep Saffron

Citizen Wolf | Mens Long Sleeve Tees in Deep Saffron

Citizen Wolf | Saffron